5 Ways to Stay Current as a Creative

September 2, 2009 at 12:08 pm (Art Event, Design, Design Events, economy, Education, Florida, Fort Lauderdale, marketing, Miami, networking, News, social event, Social Events & Networking, social media, South Florida, Uncategorized, unemployment) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

gaping1You’ve been downsized, laid-off, or decided it was time to strike out on your own and try the world of full-time freelancing and consulting…Now what? In school we’re taught that “no one designs in a vacuum”, but lets face it, when your whole company consists of you, your computer, and maybe a pet, you are not constantly surrounding by other creatives that provide inspiring stimuli. Have no fear, here are five ways I’ve found to keep myself  out of the vacuum and up to date while working as a design consultant:

1. Stay in the loop through social media
Social media can mean different things to different people, but what it comes down to is forging relationships with people online who you may not have otherwise met or stayed in contact with. Though reluctant to it at first, I have found Twitter to be one of the most informational and beneficial social media hubs. The reason for this is because I follow other professionals, media outlets, and design related companies and websites through Twitter. Here’s an example of a tweet from Smashing Magazine:

“@SmashingMag: 30 Amazing Retro Posters and Flyers – http://bit.ly/nG9i4#retro #inspiration

If I’m interested in the topic I don’t have to search through the website, because the link is right there. Other good online networking and portfolio sites are: Facebook, LinkedIn, Behance, and Coroflot.

2. Socialize and network in real face-to-face situations.
If you are on Twitter or Tumblr you might want to attend a local tweetup, where twitter members gather to have real conversations. Refresh and barcamp activities are usually free and informative. The open platform allows for a wide variety of topics to be covered by several presenters. Meetup.com is another great resource. You can find social groups for just about anything. I’ve written several posts about the Shoot Miami photography group that I belong to, but there are groups for WordPress, photoshop, young professionals, etc.

You can also go to art galleries, design events, museum openings, and other social events. Mix with a new demographic, tell them what you do, and maybe you’ll generate some new business contacts.

3. Read industry (and non-industry) related publications:
You don’t have to subscribe to the publications because most of them are online. Some of my favorites for inspiration are: Smashing Magazine, Inspired Magazine, Freelance Switch, Web Designer Depot, and Wired Magazine, and I still receive printed versions of Event Design Magazine. Computer Arts Magazine is a great resource that I check out when I go to book stores, and Smithsonian Magazine and Reader’s Digest are a great resources for escaping from all the creative stimulus when you want a well written and engaging story.

4. Start a blog:
Having a blog and actually trying to write interesting, topical, and engaging information everyday really helps to change your thinking. You start looking for new technologies, techniques, events, and anything else worthy of note to add to your blog. Pick a general topic you are interested in and write about it. As our good friend Benjamin Franklin said: “Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing.”

5. Expand your creative horizons:
While working full-time you probably hit a comfortable stride. You knew what your boss wanted to see, how things should be done, and what type of clientele you were dealing with, so shake it up a little bit! Do projects outside of your comfort zone; this helps you expand your design reach. Be careful not to over extend yourself, but look for a project that is in a different style than what you are used to, or a new industry that you haven’t explored. E.g. I recently created a logo for a cake decorator. Most of the concepts I did were feminine with script fonts. This is not my usual style at all, but it expanded my design style a little further.

Another great thing you can do is volunteer. Find a museum or charitable organization within your field to help support with your time. You’ll feel better about yourself, have access to industry developments, and make valuable contacts all while doing some good in your community.

Hopefully these 5 little tips will help to keep you out of that design vacuum. Good luck in this new phase of your life, and remember to enjoy the journey.

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Freelance Camp/LaidOff Camp Miami

June 14, 2009 at 3:32 pm (Design Events, Education, Florida, free, Miami, networking, social event, Social Events & Networking, South Florida) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

Laid Off Camp

Freelance Camp/LaidOff Camp Miami on June 6th was a good time. I was a bit apprehensive at first, thinking that it was going to be a bunch of people moping around begging for jobs. This couldn’t have been further from the truth. Here’s a quick recap of how I spent my day:

One of the most interesting events outside of the presentations was the elevator pitch booth. This allowed attendees to talk on camera for 60-seconds as if they were alone in an elevator with a corporate exec and only had that short period time to make a memorable statement about their business.

Jorge Lázaro Díaz (www.careerjockey.org) made a strong presentation about networking mentality. Within his presentation he discussed ineffective job hunt activities, job hunt activities that work, and his most important advice about networking was to keep your message to other people clear, concise, and memorable.

Ray Knight, Chief Envisioneer Officer of RaynMaker (www.raynmaker.com), presented a short, impromptu, speech followed by a small group discussion. He message was simple – we have to rethink the way we sell our businesses, our products, and ourselves.  Everyone is bombarded with sales pitches all day everyday, so how can we do this differently? He presented the advantages and disadvantages of strategic alliances. I would enjoy seeing a presentation form him that dives deeper into these network strategies.

Patrick Barbanes (www.patrickbarbanes.com) gave a great presentation about Linkedin. It was entertaining and informative. The only drawback was that his time slot was too short. I hope he has the opportunity to have an hour-long presentation about getting the most out of Linkedin in the future.

The last presentation was a panel discussion regarding social media. Mediated by Rick Tuttle, the panel consisted of Craig Agranoff, Maria De Los Angeles, and Yvette Ferry. Collectively they addressed the importance of social media in business and personal relationships. The discussion also morphed into some quality information on keeping up with all this media by utilizing RSS feeds and services like Google™ Reader.

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