Money gets Illustrated

July 3, 2009 at 11:03 am (Art, economy, Graphic Design, Illustration, News, print media) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

Money MagazineDo the right thing in a recession
In a tough economy you may face some hard decisions when it comes to money and your relationships with family and friends. Our ethics experts weigh in on how to handle some particularly thorny dilemmas.”

This is not the title and intro of an article you would expect to have interesting, or even good, illustrations associated with it. Surprisingly enough the staff at Money Magazine have arranged for this and many other articles to have strong graphics and illustrations complementing their reports.

Toronto based illustrator Kagan McLeod created the illustrations for the “Do the right thing in a recession” article. I really enjoyed this set of graphics. Our protagonist remains the same identifiable character throughout the article. He is groomed and dressed in the same uniform – gray shirt and bluish-gray pants in various states of dress – throughout the article, while the antagonist(s) for each sub-article are displayed in monotone gradations.

The graphics are easy to digest as simple visuals, and they complement each storyline well. The content of the article is good, too. I look forward to the editors of Money Magazine continuing with the strong graphics, after all, illustrators need work, too.

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Michael Jackson Breaks Internet

June 27, 2009 at 2:29 pm (Branding, News) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

michael_jackson_1As word spread about Michael Jackson’s hospitalize and death millions of people reached out to the Internet to get the latest reports. So much so that many sites ran slow or completely froze. The Chicago Tribune reported “when the first reports of Jackson’s death emerged, the average speed for downloading major news sites doubled to almost 9 seconds from less than 4 seconds.”

At the peak of Internet queries 3,566,495 visitors per minute visited news sites in search of updates, as reported by the LA Times. Twitter reached over 100,000 references to Michael Jackson per hour, and Wikipedia editors debated the accuracy of death reports so much that administrators decided to lock down the page. The last time such a major and nearly instantaneous Internet response occurred about an event was the inauguration of President Obama.

All this activity cements my belief that Michael Jackson was not only the King of Pop, but the King of Branding.

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